Scotland

Homelessness

Key points

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Graph 1: Over time

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Graph 2: By household type

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Graph 3: By local authority

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Map

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Definitions and data sources

The first graph shows the number of households accepted by their local authorities as homeless each year, with the data being broken down into three broad household types: households with dependent children, single person households aged 25 or more and single person households aged less than 25.  The figures include both households who are 'priority' and those who are 'non-priority'.  The small number of couples without children who are accepted as homeless are not shown.

The second graph shows, for the latest year, how the proportion of households accepted as homeless by their local authority varies by household type.

The third graph and map show how the proportion of all households who are accepted as homeless by their local authority varies by local authority.  To improve its statistical reliability, the data is averaged over the latest three years.  To derive the proportions from the absolute numbers, data on total household numbers by local authority from the 2001 Census is used.

The data for all the graphs is the Scottish Government statistical bulletin entitled Operation of the homeless persons legislation in Scotland.

Overall adequacy of the indicator: medium.  While there is no reason to believe there is any problem with the underlying data, the extent to which it leaves 'homelessness' dependent on administrative interpretation means that there is some uncertainty about the extent to which the figures accurately measure the scale of the homelessness problem.  Also, not all homeless people apply to local authorities to be classified as such and, for example, the increased in the number of single people applying since 2002 might be due, at least in part, to the widening eligibility for temporary accommodation introduced in September 2002.

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External links

See the University of Glasgow Urban Studies Department's paper on structural trends and homelessness.

 

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