Wales

Not in education, employment or training

Key points

top

Graph 1: Over time

View Graph as PDF (resizeable)   Right click to save large version of Graph as PNG

top

Graph 2: Compared to the United Kingdom

View Graph as PDF (resizeable)   Right click to save large version of Graph as PNG

top

Graph 3: by deprivation

View Graph as PDF (resizeable)   Right click to save large version of Graph as PNG

top

Graph 4: By expectation

View Graph as PDF (resizeable)   Right click to save large version of Graph as PNG

top

Graph 5: By local authority

View Graph as PDF (resizeable)   Right click to save large version of Graph as PNG

top

Map

View Map as PDF (resizeable)   Right click to save large version of Map as PNG

top

Definitions and data sources

The first graph shows the proportion of 16- to 18-year-olds who are not in education, employment or training (sometimes referred to as NEETs).

The second graph shows how proportion of 16- to 18-year-olds who are not in education, employment or training in Wales compares with the rest of the United Kingdom.  To improve its statistical reliability, the data is the average for the latest three years.

The data source for the first two graphs is the Labour Force Survey (LFS).  Note that the figures are not precisely the same as those in official government publications because government publications are typically based on analysis of the fourth quarter data for each year only.

The third graph shows how the proportion of young adults who go on to higher education varies by electoral ward.  The wards are grouped by level of deprivation and, for each group, the graph shows the proportion of the wards in this group where fewer than 16% and between 16% and 24% of the young adults go on higher education.

The fourth graph provides an analysis of the numbers of wards where the proportion of young adults going on to higher education is significantly different from that which might be expected given the level of deprivation in that ward.  A ward is classified as "more than expected going on to higher education" if any of the following are true: the ward is in the most deprived fifth but the proportion of young adults going onto higher education is more than 24%; the ward is in the second most deprived fifth but the proportion of young adults going onto higher education is more than 32%, or the ward has average deprivation but the proportion of young adults going onto higher education is more than 43%.  A ward is classified as "less than expected going on to higher education" if any of the following are true: the ward is in the least deprived fifth but the proportion of young adults going onto higher education is less than 32%; the ward is in the second least deprived fifth but the proportion of young adults going onto higher education is less than 24%, or the ward has average deprivation but the proportion of young adults going onto higher education is less than 16%.

The fifth graph shows how the proportion of young adults who go on to higher education varies by local authority.

The data source for the third, fourth and fifth graph is participation of local areas (POLAR) data published by the Higher Education Funding Council for England (HEFCE).  At ward level, the latest data is for 1999 and the data presented is the average for the years 1997 to 1999.  At the local authority level, the latest data is 2000 and the data presented is the average for the years 1997 to 2000.  At the regional level, the data is for the year 2000.

Overall adequacy of the indicator: limited.  The LFS is a large, well-established, quarterly government survey designed to be representative of the population as a whole but nevertheless the sample sizes for this age group are small.  Furthermore, the number of NEETs is estimated by deducting those in education, employment or training from the total population and LFS may not always capture all types of education or training that a person is engaged with.

top