Wales

Longstanding illness/disability

Key points

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Graph 1: By age and social class

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Graph 2: By local authority

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Map

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Graph 3: Compared to the United Kingdom

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Definitions and data sources

The first graph shows the proportion of adults self-reporting a limiting long-standing illness by age band (16-34, 35-59 and 60+) and social class.  To improve its statistical reliability, the data is the average for the latest three years.

The data source for the first graph is the Welsh Health Survey (WHS).  The social classes are the National Statistics Socio-economic Classification (NS-SEC) introduced for all official statistics and surveys since 2001.  The 'never worked and long-term unemployed' social class is not included in the graph because of its small sample sizes.

The second graph shows how the proportion of working-age people self-reporting a limiting long-standing illness varies by local authority.

The third graph shows how the proportion of working-age people self-reporting a limiting long-standing illness in Wales compares with the rest of the United Kingdom.

For each of the 10,000 'output areas' in Wales, the map shows the proportion of adults aged 16 to 59 self-reporting a limiting long-standing illness.

'Output areas' are a small area geography defined by the Office of National Statistics for analysing data at a small area level.  They have been defined so that they have roughly equal populations.

Only output areas with an above-average proportion are shaded, with the darkest shade being the sixth of output areas with the highest proportions, the next shade being the second sixth and the lightest shade being the third sixth.

The data source for the second and third graphs plus the map is the 2001 Census (tables so016 and so024 for England and Wales, S16 for Scotland and S016 for Northern Ireland).

Overall adequacy of the indicator: medium.  The question in both WHS and the Census is the usually accepted way of measuring the prevalence of limiting long-standing illness.  However, the absence of data about household income in WHS limits the analyses that are possible.

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